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Updated: 1 hour 30 min ago

Diana Byrd

Wed, 08/07/2019 - 10:22
Diana Byrd

Age: 16

School: Dr. Charles E. Brimm Medical Arts High School

Lab: Krantz Lab

Supervisor: Maninder Kaur 

What’s one cool thing about the program so far? 

“We visited the Center for Autism Research at CHOP, and they have a technology that helps kids with autism become more comfortable speaking with, or associating with, police officers. There’s a simulation that uses virtual reality that we had the chance to try out, and it’s so cool.”

Saada Wing

Wed, 08/07/2019 - 10:21
Saada Wing

Age: 16

School: Mount Pleasant High School 

Lab: Krantz Lab

Supervisor: Maninder Kaur

What’s one cool thing about the program so far? 

“I feel like I’ve progressed in becoming more knowledgeable and learned how to do things on my own. [Maninder] teaches you that you have to do it on your own first, before getting help. And it’s really exciting to actually be in the lab and learn a lot of new and different things. My favorite thing so far would be PCR (polymerase chain reaction). I think it’s really interesting how you are able to make multiple copies of one sample of DNA.”

Jordan Hawkins

Wed, 08/07/2019 - 10:19
Jordan Hawkins

Age: 16

School: Dr. Charles E. Brimm Medical Arts High School

Lab: Spinner Lab

Supervisor: Debbie McEldrew

What’s one cool thing about the program so far? 

“I think it’s really cool how we can actually see how cells work and function. We can use a microscope and even take a picture of them!”

Ade Forrest

Wed, 08/07/2019 - 10:15
Ade Forrest

Age: 16

School: Roman Catholic High School

Lab: Spinner Lab

Supervisor: Debbie McEldrew

What’s one cool thing about the program so far? 

“Definitely extracting the DNA was what I found most interesting. You can take a sample, take DNA from it, and use PCR (polymerase chain reaction) to see the exact strain that you want.”

Madizon Martinez

Wed, 08/07/2019 - 10:13
Madizon Martinez

Age: 16

School: Dr. Charles E. Brimm Medical Arts High School

Lab: Bhatnagar Lab

Supervisor: Sandra Luz

What’s one cool thing about the program so far? 

“On the computer, I’ve learned how to use ImageJ to count all the cells in an image for image analysis, and so far, this is the most interesting thing that I’ve been taught! It’s completely new and something completely different. But every day, they’re exposing us to something different through the program.  During lunch, they’ll have a career topic, and you can learn about more opportunities for the future. And we’re also going to get CPR-certified, so it’s opening up our ideas of what we want to take as our major and the different options for job opportunities.”

Diamond McClelland

Wed, 08/07/2019 - 10:11
Diamond McClelland

Age: 16

School: Christiana High School

Lab: Bhatnagar Lab

Supervisor: Sandra Luz

What’s one cool thing about the program so far? 

“I really like the career exposure because you explore different areas and campuses. For example, we went to the Roberts Center for Pediatric Research and the Center for Autism Research. I like that because it’s different. There are a lot of different careers that they offer that you don’t even know about or hear about.”

Deborah Dibal

Wed, 08/07/2019 - 10:10
Deborah Dibal

Age: 16

School: MOT Charter High School

Lab: Marsh Lab

Supervisor: Almedia McCoy

What’s one cool thing about the program so far? 

“What I love so far is the hands-on experience. In school, we do get to do stuff like pipetting, but this is a lot different because it goes beyond that: You get to do stains, you get to look at cells under a microscope. I really love the field trips because it’s not just working in the lab or learning about college; it’s also about looking at other parts of the medical field and what people do. We get exposure to a lot of different fields in medicine, and I feel like that’s really important.”

Saniah Aaron

Wed, 08/07/2019 - 10:09
Saniah Aaron

Age: 16

School: Paul Robeson High School for Human Services

Lab: Marsh Lab

Supervisor: Almedia McCoy

What’s one cool thing about the program so far? 

“The first thing would be the hands-on experience. When I’m learning, I need to do something hands-on to stay engaged. I think my favorite part would be the experiments. But in and out of the lab, I gain more knowledge about how to plan for the future, including finding a college that’s fit for me, finding ways to plan what I want to do, and how to go about it that best works for me. This program gives you a head start for college plans, but it also lets me gain knowledge on different areas of the medical field that I never thought about doing.”

Edward Behrens, MD

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 09:09
Edward Behrens, MD, chief of the Division of Rheumatology, Joseph Lee Hollander Chair in Pediatric Rheumatology at CHOP, and associate professor of PediatricsEdward Behrens, MD

Interacting with the next generation of learners is an incredibly meaningful way to propagate the advancement of medical science for current patients as well as for all of the patients yet to come. Illustrating how the basic sciences can inform clinical care for patients, particularly for those who fall between the cracks of our refined existing pathways and algorithms, helps trainees at all levels reconnect with the roots of medical education in a significant way. 

For me, teaching is not just the transmission of factoids from one mind to another, but mentoring trainees to develop their own set of tools to rigorously investigate and discover new truths. This is how we move forward our capacity to effectively care for those for whom we have no answers today, but for whom we provide hope for a better future. 

Teaching the outstanding trainees at CHOP and Penn encourages me to be become a better physician-scientist, as the questions they often ask are not biased by preconception, and therefore are often the most insightful and provocative. This has, on more than one occasion, led to entirely new research directions and important new insights. I look forward to continuing to have the privilege of interacting with these fantastic young minds.

Joel Fein, MD, MPH

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 09:07
Joel Fein, MD, MPH, director of Advocacy and Health Policy in the Emergency Department, advocacy advisor for Government Affairs at CHOP, and professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine Joel Fein, MD, MPH

Having been raised at CHOP, I was faced with constant examples of what kind of educator I wanted to be “when I grew up.” Bedside teaching, although more haphazard and difficult to complete in a chaotic, busy clinical environment, gives me the most satisfaction. 

What I learned from my mentors, and realized I enjoy the most, is how to teach students to organize their thoughts around a clinical presentation or chief complaint. Factoids are important, but critical thinking is, well, critical. Not only are we exchanging clinical information but, more importantly, are able to teach communication style, listening skills, and how to actually get the information we need to make a diagnosis and plan — things we cannot get from any book or online resource.

During those one-on-one dialogues in the ED, the teacher and student roles are actually more fluid, and my trainees get to keep me updated on the latest approaches and medical management protocols they are learning from my colleagues elsewhere in the hospital.

I feel similarly about teaching in a research setting — it’s all about how to help someone make their brilliant ideas feasible, digestible, and fundable!

Meryl Cohen, MD

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 09:02
Meryl Cohen, MD, pediatric cardiologist in the Cardiac Center at CHOP, director of the CHOP Cardiology Fellowship Training program, associate chief of the Division of Cardiology, and professor of CardiologyMeryl Cohen, MD

What I find so rewarding about teaching is seeing your students achieve more than you. I am very proud of my students who have gone on to very successful careers. I often hear myself using pearls that were given to me by my teachers and mentors. We all want to have a legacy in our careers, and for me, that legacy will hopefully be that my teaching will live on in my students.

There is tremendous satisfaction when you see that a student understands a difficult concept or shows great enthusiasm for an interesting clinical case. Some of my favorite interactions with students are in small groups or one-on-one learning. One of the best aspects of teaching is when students challenge and question me. Over my career, it has certainly made me better at what I do.

Lisa Zaoutis, MD

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 08:58
Lisa Zaoutis, MD, attending physician at CHOP and associate professor of Clinical PediatricsLisa Zaoutis, MD

There are several ways that learners make me a better physician. First, learners motivate me to stay on top of the advances that are a near constant in the fast-paced world of medicine. Each learner, eager to push their own learning edge within their chosen domain, nudges me to try to stay a half-step ahead of them. Since I get to work with such a broad range of learners, each one stretches me in a slightly different area, helping to keep me vibrant and relevant across a wide spectrum.

Second, their presence makes me delightfully self-conscious, or should I say, self-aware. Any confusion I see on their faces forces me to break down my own understanding more carefully and more thoroughly. Any pushback they offer helps me reconsider my position and adjust it when appropriate. Complacency is not an option when you have bright learners challenging your knowledge, your logic, and your perspective.

Lastly, there is an undeniable joy in sharing my passion with motivated and receptive learners. The rewards of my efforts feel magnified and multiplied. It is a veritable burnout antidote.

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